What is open dementia

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Permanent placement in a closed facility

Hello!

My name is Anna and I am the carer for my 80-year-old mother with dementia, who has been in a nursing home since March 2017.

Unfortunately, five weeks ago, due to the fact that my mother wanted to throw herself from the roof terrace in the nursing home and because she repeatedly shows aggressiveness (kicking, hitting, biting and throwing objects) towards the nursing staff, due to a temporary injunction according to Section 1906 Paragraph 1 No. 1 BGB in conjunction with Conn. With § 331 FAmFG in the local closed G1 gerontopsychiatry.

Well, after these 6 weeks I feel compelled to apply for an extension on Monday. The district court informed me that this will take place for a maximum of six more weeks.

I very much hope that the doctors can put my mother on medication.
To take away from her her stress, extreme restlessness and aggressiveness.

So far this has been unsuccessful because my mother does not understand why tablets (high blood pressure, rheumatism + two neuroleptics) have to be taken. It goes well for two days, then she spits out the pills and runs nervously through the floor throughout the day. Of course, if you also refuse hygienic help of any kind, you pour tea on the face of your fellow human beings.

The district court already spoke to me that after this extension, thus a total of 12 weeks at a time, only a “final” placement in a closed facility can follow. Should there be no success.
For this purpose, an expert opinion must be prepared in good time. So I should think about it well before the next 6 weeks are up!

I dread the thought! I want to see my mother in the nursing home again and not in a closed psychiatric ward.

Question: Can I refuse this? I would like to at least have my mother in the nursing home again. Maybe it'll work out after all. At least for another time.

I also know z. Currently not whether the statutory health insurance will continue to take over the accommodation in the G1 in the future. So far this has been a case of illness for which the health insurance company pays. I will continue to pay for the nursing home with minimal cuts. Is not a social welfare case; I pay for the care place from the property.

Question:
If there is no success after a further six weeks at the latest and there is a final placement, will my mother no longer be a case of illness in the sense of social law? Does this then turn into a nursing case?

If so, is it likely that health insurance will no longer cover the cost of the G1?

Then I would have to give up the care place in the home in order to be able to pay for the accommodation in a closed facility.

Is there anyone with experience or knowledge of such a situation?

LG
Anna

I went to the local court today and submitted / signed the application for an extension.

My question what a "final" placement means in terms of social law was answered.
It is an accommodation in a hospital or home with an enclosed floor. So this would mean that I would have to give up the current nursing home place in order to be able to pay for the new one. This for an indefinite period of time, perhaps permanently. Should something improve in my mother's condition during the course of the placement (**), I could look around for a new nursing home place and it would be relocated.

Whereby this (**) is probably unrealistic!

There seem to be very few such closed houses. Maybe 10 (?) In NRW.
All too far away from me!

I don't want anything!

Conclusion: I now hope that geriatric psychiatry will reach my mother with medication in the next 6 weeks at the most, so that she can come back to the nursing home.

LG
Anna

Member since October 19, 2016

Hello Anna
Today my brother (59), who is ill with FTD, was admitted to a closed home by his wife without warning and against the wishes of our parents. As was to be expected, he rebelled there and looked over the garden fence. The police called for help then referred him to the local geriatric psychiatry.

I therefore understand your situation very well. A "closed" one is extremely daunting at first, but unfortunately there are situations where we relatives do not seem to have any other option.
I've been trying to prepare for this case X for the past few weeks. As with you in North Rhine-Westphalia, there is only a limited selection of homes here in Bavaria that are geared towards dementia patients with behavioral problems and that can quickly find a place. Unfortunately, I had to give up personal selection criteria such as "too far" after a few days. However, a persistent search is worthwhile: there are actually very good homes with closed departments that are not very different from the open departments, or rather. are under one roof with them.
The differentiation between "closed" and "protected department" here in this country is also interesting: depending on the home definition, "protective" is sometimes closed in Bavaria, but it can also be a form of closed "light" in which the home residents are equipped with trackers. This then prevents, for example, the main exit door from opening. In general, I found this light version much more appealing, but it is very much up to the home management to what extent they see patients as suitable for this type of accommodation, or of course also to what extent the patients integrate there.
This search engine helped me a lot, but unfortunately it is not complete:
https://www.pflege-navigator.de/

I wish you and your mother all the best!
Tom

ps. Perhaps the thought will help you that an accommodation in a closed room does not have to be for eternity. My brother has already gone through various developments in his behavior over the last few years ... and we with him.

A final result.

My mother / I was lucky.
In the geriatric psychiatry, my mother was "hired" after seven weeks so that she could go back to the home. However, I had to find another ([u] not [/ u] closed) home, as the previous one was obviously not clear.

Now, based on the recommendation of the closed psychiatry, a suitable home was found 20 km away from me. I would never have come across this nursing home alone! The ladies of the house also had a look at my mother in advance to get an exact picture.

Now my mother has been in this home for 2 days and I was told that they are fine. This is now a house that looks after more demented people than age-related care cases and the demented people are all in their own living areas.

The age-related residents have their own area.

Conclusion: It should work now.

LG
Anna

Member since 09/23/2016

It's great when there is good news! So maybe you can both enjoy a quiet Christmas season.
I wish you / your mother all the best for the future and that it will stay the same for a long time to come.

LG
Thomas

Member since 02/05/2020
A final result.

My mother / I was lucky.
In the geriatric psychiatry, my mother was "hired" after seven weeks so that she could go back to the home. However, I had to find another ([u] not [/ u] closed) home, as the previous one was obviously not clear.

Now, based on the recommendation of the closed psychiatry, a suitable home was found 20 km away from me. I would never have come across this nursing home alone! The ladies of the house also had a look at my mother in advance to get an exact picture.

Now my mother has been in this home for two days and I was told that they could be fine. This is now a house that looks after more demented people than age-related care cases and the demented people are all in their own living areas.

The age-related residents have their own area.

Conclusion: It should work now.

LG
Anna

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