How do I start a Sanskrit school

What were the various reasons for the decline of the Sanskrit language in India? [closed]

Sanskrit is not a dead language in the Western concept of a dead language. Sanskrit has not been a widely used language for thousands of years. Even in the time of the Buddha in 500 BC Sanskrit was no longer a common language.

Even so, the Vedas are in Sanskrit. The Vedas have survived for thousands and thousands of years as the oldest scriptures in the world without controversy because they were transmitted in original Sanskrit. The Vedas were revealed to man in Sanskrit. Many important commentaries on the scriptures have been and are being written in Sanskrit.

Swami Vivekananda said that all people in India could be educated spiritually and culturally through the study of Sanskrit, and actively promoted the study of Sanskrit by all. Brahmin experts and learned sadhus are still proficient in both written and spoken Sanskrit. I have met sadhus whose scriptures are still written in Sanskrit. There are Sanskrit libraries of ancient commentaries that are still preserved and studied in various kinds of math.

Many sadhus commands require study and knowledge of Sanskrit before giving sannyas.

Keshav Srinivasan ♦

In fact, Sanskrit is a dead language because a dead language is defined as a language that is nobody's mother tongue.

ShreevatsaR

@ KeshavSrinivasan: That is not the only definition of dead language, and it is very misleading considering how many connotations "dead" have in common parlance.

Keshav Srinivasan ♦

@ShreevatsaR This is the standard definition for dead language: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_death "In linguistics, language death (including language death, linguistic extinction or linguicide and rarely also glottophagy) occurs when a language loses its last native speaker."

Keshav Srinivasan ♦

@ShreevatsaR And I think the connotations of the term are spot on. Languages ​​thrive when at least some people use them as the primary method of understanding the world around them. So it's fair to declare them dead when that process has stopped, which sadly happened to Sanskrit (at least for now).

ShreevatsaR

@ KeshavSrinivasan According to this definition, Sanskrit is dead from birth (its codification into an immutable form by Panini) and all major works of Sanskrit literature - all works of Kavya, Shastra, Stotra etc. (see): Kalidasa, Aryabhata, Shankara / Ramanuja, Manusmriti, Arthashastra, Kamasutra, Natyashastra) - were composed after Sanskrit "died"; Almost everything of value in Sanskrit, a purely literary and technical ecosystem, comes from the "extinction" of Sanskrit. That is a nonsensical definition in the context of Sanskrit.