What is the chemical structure of polyurethane





Epoxy resins
Formaldehyde resins
Artificial silk
viscose
Cellulose acetate
Polyacrylates
Polyacrylonitrile
Polyamides
Aramids
Polybutadiene
Polyisoprene
polyester
Sympatex
Polyethene
Polyureas
Polypropene
Polystyrene
 Polyurethane
Elastane
Polyvinyl chloride
Polytetrafluoroethylene
 

Plastics to get to know:

Polyurethanes


Polyurethanes (abbreviated to PUR) are extremely versatile plastics that are accordingly used in many different areas. Polyurethanes are mainly used as foam, e.g. for upholstered furniture, mattresses, sponges, winter clothing, coating of carpets, construction foam for thermal insulation, packaging material ...
But polyurethanes are much more than foam: They can also be used as paints and adhesives, as thermoplastics for the production of rollers, cylinders, etc., as elastomers and as fibers, e.g. as elastane.

But now to chemistry: Polyurethanes contain urethane bonds:

They are produced in a polyaddition reaction from dialcohols and diisocyanates, whereby polyethers such as polyethylene glycol are often used instead of the dialcohols. A frequently used polyurethane is, for example, the following:

If higher-valent alcohols are used instead of dialcohols, thermosets, solid, stable, cross-linked plastics that are used in paints for furniture, floors and boats and in printing inks are obtained.


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