Is S video better than composite


Leave the archive and display this page in the standard design: Video editing: Composite better than S-Video?


Hi!
I have the Pinnacle MovieBoard PCI-500 including Studio 12 for a few days (patched to 12.1).
Now I would like to transfer my old VHS tapes to the PC and then burn them to DVD if necessary (still to be saved qualitatively). So far so good.
Now I have a Philips 6-head video recorder, a Scart adapter with audio (red / white), S-Video (4-pin) and composite (yellow cinch).
My cable to the PC is a 4-pin S-Video, alternatively I have a 4-pin to composite adapter.
So far I've heard everywhere that S-Video is the better alternative, i.e. qualitatively better than composite in any case. Now my first experiences have taught me better: The quality of the composite is significantly better than that of the 4-pole. Do I have other disadvantages or can / should I leave everything as it is?

Another question in this context: Does it make sense to then run an "original" composite cable directly to the PC on the Scart adapter? So basically to save the detour via the adapter and thus achieve further quality improvements?

Looks like this at the moment:
Video (scart adapter) -> S-video cable -> adapter S-video to composite -> video card

do you think it might be like this:
Video (scart adapter) -> composite cable -> video card better?

I'll make myself smart about the further processing, possibly also here in the forum
But basically, this is exactly the question that interests me right now;)

Thank you in advance and sorry if this question is too "stupid". But I'm an absolute noob in video editing: - [

greetings
Marcus

As far as I know, the quality problem is with the S-Video to composite adapter, here the color and brightness information is simply short-circuited, which is why the native composite signal from the VHS is better.
Does your video card only have a composite input?

As far as I know, the quality problem is with the S-Video to composite adapter, here the color and brightness information is simply short-circuited, which is why the native composite signal from the VHS is better.
Does your video card only have a composite input?
No, it has both composite and S-video.
I only tried it out because the S-Video quality wasn't the best, so just for fun I clipped the adapter and clipped the cable onto the composite socket. And the quality was visibly better ...
The scart adapter on the VHS also has both composite and S-video, but I only have an S-video cable and the said adapter.

I claim that the video recorder cannot do S-video and the wiring will not change anything because the signal remains the same.

I claim that the video recorder cannot do S-video and the cabling will not change anything because the signal remains the same.
So I have such a scart adapter: http://server6.gs-shop.de/200/cgi-bin/shop.dll?SESSIONID=0103407517075539&AnbieterID=3388
Does it matter from there to the signal whether it is sent via S-Video or composite to the PC?
For me it happens as I said with an S-video cable, then the adapter comes to composite and then it goes to the capture card.
And the quality is just better than without an adapter directly into the PC via S-Video, that just amazes me;)

I have the Pinnacle MovieBoard PCI-500 including Studio 12 for a few days (patched to 12.1).
Now I would like to transfer my old VHS tapes to the PC and then burn them to DVD if necessary (still to be saved qualitatively). So far so good.
Basically I would have used a DV bridge for this purpose (Canopus ADVC 110 or 55), but it would have been a bit more expensive.

Now I have a Philips 6-head video recorder, a Scart adapter with audio (red / white), S-Video (4-pin) and composite (yellow cinch).
As PatkIllA said, it will only be able to output a FBAS signal anyway. When recording, chrominance (color) and luminance (brightness) are also separated here, but are brought back together on the output side (I am not aware of any VHS recorder with S-Video output which, in contrast to SVHS, has an increased luminance bandwidth (the then with a composite signal "disturbs"), also hardly / would bring no advantages).

Your problem: If you had a video recorder that can output S-Video on the Scart, when using the S-Video connector, luminance and chrominance are actually transmitted on separate lines. If the receiver does not understand this, there is only a B / W picture (since an S-Video to composite adapter only evaluates the luminance channel).

In your case, the recorder cannot create an S-Video signal. Now the following should happen when using the S-Video output: The chrominance is "officially" not transmitted at all. However, the full composite signal is now on the luminance channel. That is not ideal. I am amazed that the video card can do anything with it (and not just output a B / W picture, as it only expects the luminance signal on this line). With the S-Video to composite adapter, you can "straighten out" that which the card naturally expects a composite signal on its composite input.

The following way would be correct for you: FBAS from the VHS recorder (via the composite output) to the composite input of the video card. Then you can be sure that the video card uses the signal optimally.

As far as I know, the quality problem is with the S-Video to composite adapter, here the color and brightness information is simply short-circuited,
These adapters are very primitive. Here only the luminance signal should be tapped. The thread starter only has a color image because the video recorder cannot S-Video and so the full composite signal is on the luminance line.

greeting

Denis

@Denis:
That's a great explanation :)
I'll get me a "simple" composite cable, then I won't have any more adapter gimmicks and thus a "better feeling";)

I could imagine that composite might even look more authentic with VHS than Y / C or bridge. Ultimately, you had these artifacts (pearl cords, moire) on the right television set. But you have to see that in a direct comparison and is certainly a matter of taste.

I once pulled out a few old comparisons for you. There you get at least an impression between composite and better signal (in this case Y / C).

http://img3.imagebanana.com/img/3q34vb1/thumb/CompositeSVideo1.jpg (http://img3.imagebanana.com/img/3q34vb1/CompositeSVideo1.jpg) http://img3.imagebanana.com/img/ qmsewhq9 / thumb / CompositeSVideo2.jpg (http://img3.imagebanana.com/img/qmsewhq9/CompositeSVideo2.jpg)

I could imagine that composite might even look more authentic with VHS than Y / C or bridge. Ultimately, you had these artifacts (pearl cords, moire) on the right television set.
Whereby the effects in the VHS are only slightly pronounced anyway. The bandwidth for chrominance and, above all, luminance is reduced considerably compared to the output signal. At SVHS that would be a completely different matter. Whatever: he only gets a FBAS signal from his VHS recorder. The disturbances when using the S-Video output on the adapter are attributed to the very "crude" signal routing, although I am still amazed that the card records a color image at all. So it already recognizes that there is a composite signal on the luminance line.

greeting

Denis

vBulletin®, Copyright © 2000-2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.